A recruiter’s fools gold….

ImageBeing a recruiter is hard. You spend most of your time hunting around for the right candidates to fill your jobs, or the right jobs for your candidates…and a lot of the time it is like looking for a needle in a haystack.

So when we recruiters come across that little gold nugget that is the ideal candidate, or the perfect role, we are like a horny virgin on prom night. A couple of positive telephone calls later and bingo…I can practically smell the placement already.  Put the champagne on ice, get ready to ring that bell, and book me an early finish on Friday….

But two weeks later you find yourself explaining to your boss why ‘that sure thing’ hasn’t actually happened, as you lay the blame at everyone and anyone.

If you have ever experienced this scenario, the fact is that it will probably be your fault. Sure, candidates and clients don’t always do what we want them to. But that is not the reason you didn’t make the fee.  The reason you didn’t make the fee is nearly always you.

Here’s what happens….

In the excitement of being presented with that golden ticket that is an easy fee, you forget (or more accurately, are not bothered) to do all the things that you normally do.  After all, your client has said they want to hire someone quickly and the candidate that you have stumbled across has the ideal background and told you they are super interested in the role.  Job done…. why bother wasting time doing much more.

And then comes the inevitable. The candidate’s Great Aunt Maud dies suddenly and they have to attend the funeral interstate so won’t be able to interview for a week. Or their version of ‘super interested’ isn’t quite as ‘super’ as you thought. Or the client’s urgent need now can wait until the boss is back from overseas…. next month. Or another of the billion and one scenarios that cause deals to fall over.

Easy fees are a recruiter’s fools gold. They are hard to come by, and rarely is any fee actually as easy as it initially appears. Sure, we have all been touched by a bit of ‘right time, right place’ good fortune before. It’s very nice when it happens. But when you start counting the money, and focusing on the end dollar instead of the process then you are playing a risky game. When you put all your eggs into one basket; when you don’t cover everything off or ask the right questions as you normally would; or when you make assumptions of people you don’t really know then you don’t need to look any further than the mirror for someone to blame.

A manager of mine used to say:

“It’s only a placement when the guarantee period is over”

And I would tend to agree with that.

Luke Collard

8 thoughts on “A recruiter’s fools gold….”

    1. Thanks Lysha – unfortunately I was ‘inspired’ to write this blog as I had done exactly the opposite of what I am preaching…and the result was as expected. Even with over 10 years experience, a timely reminder to respect the recruitment process !!

  1. Very good Blog this.. Alot of my consultants where shocked that I had a very very good end to q4 2012 and to my own amazement I thought yes alot of it just fell into place and I have been lucky. (Golden Nuggets) But looking over the history it seems alot of the ” extra boxes I ticked” earlier in Q2 / Q3 really paid off – So by doing the bit more and “working Smarter” you do find those little gems.

  2. Very good Blog this.. A lot of my consultants where shocked that I had a very very good end to Q4 2012 and to my own amazement I thought yes a lot of it just fell into place and I have been lucky. (Golden Nuggets) But looking over the history it seems a lot of the ” extra boxes I ticked” earlier in Q2 / Q3 really paid off – So by doing that bit more and “working Smarter” you do find those little gems.

  3. Yes agree… good read and analysis of a common recruitment fault. But doesnt apply to me… Im a “lucky” recruiter… harder I work the luckier I get. 🙂

  4. Are you able to manual me on your website owner or perhaps the man which takes care of your blog, I must know if it will be very easy to be a guest poster.

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